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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
ever before since scientists began monitoring asteroids. nasa says there's no chance of impact from it. the asteroid is said to be about the size of an olympic swimming pool and will come 17,000 mile from the earth. >>> now to a story we first brought you as breaking news today, oscar pistorius arrested in the death of his super model girlfriend. prosecutors announced they're going to pursue premedicated charges against him. here's jessica kartalija with a closer look at the case. >> olympic track star oscar pistorius looks down as he leaves the police station charged with murder. >> a young woman did die on the scene of gunshot wounds. >> that woman was reeva steenkemp, a model and girlfriend of pistorius. she was shot four times inside athletes home. the 26-year-old sprinter known as the blade runner for his high-tech artificial legs is a national hero in south africa. he made history at the london olympics last summer, becoming the first double a amputee runner to ever compete at the game. pistorius had been with his girlfriend for several months and would have celebrated their firs
of mosquito to about 50%. they say they are not transmitting the west nile virus. >>> nasa will stream the astroid's approach starting 9:00 pacific time. it is the closest to ever get to earth and they say it is the size of the white house. >> that is pretty good moving passed us. >> sal, is traffic moving fast out there? >> it is in many areas, dave and pam, we are looking at 280 north and south and you can go as fast as you legally can, no major problems on the sunole grade and i am not showing you the dense fog, at 5:57, let's go pack to the desk. >>> a deadly shooting on an elementary school campus, what we are learning about the young victim and how he was well- known in the area. >>> luring businesses away? we will tell you more about
out of the government come from nasa or the military. and that's what we're seeing working. of course, a lot of spaghetti taxpayer dollars thrown against the wall. the market don't want electric cars or electric battery cars. it leaves them feeling like they'll be stranded in the woods without any gas or any power to get out of the woods. it stresses them out. so we talk a lot also about nat gas, yes, it's helped by the federal government, but that was a resource that was sitting there. electric batteries had to be developed by people with a lot of taxpayer money. >> morgan, even folks like from the "washington post," charles lane, was talking about how americans just don't want electric cars. for all the money we pour, for all the tax breaks we give to people who buy them, americans still don't want them because they deliver inferior performance at a much higher cost, like much of what the government does. >> yeah. so going back to my point, we streamline where we're make these investments and there is a wealth of data that shows that some of these investments have been very wasteful
: how much warning do we get? >> nasa tracks these things. they're able to track 90% of the asteroids that could come close to us. but in this case, there was really no warning. people don't know what's going on. >> brian: i remember in the video game, you could shoot an asteroid out of the sky. i know in armageddon, in the movies, bruce willis and ben affleck were able to -- who else was in that? were able to stop it. is that what we're going to have to do at some point? >> nasa does track these things and they have the capability to stop them before they come close to earth. >> brian: lasers? >> all sorts of things. >> steve: there has been a nasa plan to send some sort of ship onto an asteroid, but once again, the asteroid that's going to come between us and some of our satellites later today, that's going to be far away, right? >> it's relatively close. the closest they've come in centuries. so that's why people are a little nervous. but no, it's not going to hit us. >> alisyn: let us know if there is ever one coming, all right? >> brian: even if we're in sports or in an interview
from nasa? >> we've been to nasa. they treat us like we're a bunch of space ka deads. but this could be a game-changer. >> why is it important? >> it's important because we need an insurance poll i. inevitably we're going to need one. it's inevitable. we need to have an early warning system and president obama had stated that a priority would be to land on an asteroid that. could help to focus our efforts to not just land on an asteroid but to deflect an asteroid. so bruce willis watch out. >> if we did know about this asteroid, is there anyway to take it out before we head toward earth? >> we don't want it to come to earth. what we need to do is nudge it or push it when it's farther out. that would take a few decades to get a booster asteroid on it. >> early detection would make a difference too. >> early detection is the key to it took years to build this business. the moment my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis started getting in the way that was it... it was time for a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescribed humira-adalimumab. humi
know. there might be a television satellite that happens to wonder into it path. although nasa has calculated we don't think it will happen. >> reporter: the asteroid is supposed to come by earth at 11:25 a.m. pacific time. it's not supposed come by here until 7:00 tonight. the next time this asteroid will come close to earth is 2046. it's not visible to the naked eye. but if you want to check it out the chabot space and science center will be open tonight. >>> time is 5:02. over night news san francisco police are investigating a frightening incident involving a stolen car. there was a chase, a crash, and gunfire. ktvu tara moriarty is here to tell us the chase ended with a multicar crash right on a busy downtown section. tara. >> reporter: it took quite awhile for the reconstruction team to figure out how this accident happened. it was pretty complex. you can see behind me even though the scene has be cleared it's still messy with medical supplies and oil and tire marks on the road. just before 10:00 last night someone stole a black town car. >> there was surveillance until they
? >> nasa has a program to search for these objects and we've done a good job at finding the large ones. we put the priority on finding the large one first. the one that hit on friday was really a tiny asteroid, pretty small. >> anna: it's wild that this tiny one caused this much damage. you say mostly what you're looking for are the ones that are 400 feet in size and up, right? >> yes. a city block and larger. those are ones that would reach the surface. the one that hit over russia was broken up by the atmosphere. so there was only the damage from the shock wave. the larger ones, if they reach the surface in one piece, can cause great damage. >> peter: when you talk about the larger ones, what are we talking about? something as big as a kilometer? do those exist? >> oh, yes. oh, yes. and that's about a half mile. nasa has done a good job of finding 95% of those ones. the idea is to find them many, many years before they could hit the earth and calculate when and where the hazard is and if there is a hazard sometime in the future, then we could possibly do something about it. >> steve: now
. >> and if that's not enough, today 130,000-ton astroid had a close encounter with the earth. here's how the n.a.s.a. folks explained what could happen. >> astroid 2012da14 is an object about half the size. a football field in diameter that is going to pass very close to the earth on february 15th. coming from the south to the north it gets to within 17,200 miles of the earth's surface and will pass the interior to the gps satellites, but there's no chance of the as street hitting the earth and very little chance it will hit a satellite. >> they were right. they say this was the closest fly-by ever of a space rock of this size. and it was traveling at more than 17,000 miles an hour. that's it for us tonight. thank for watching. i'm juan williams in for bill o'reilly. please remember, the spin comes here because we are looking out for you.
as well. for example faa's operation of the national airspace system, nasa's space exploration program are necessary new satellite -- but these are weather satellite programs -- they range well beyond national security. the diverse group of leaders here with us today are going to attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by doc or stephen bulic of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. the study says sequestration if it goes forward will put 2.1 million -- 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non-defense related jobs and they include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cause the unemployment rate to rise by 1.5% and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. 215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast cbo reinforces dr. bullet's -- that will undermine u.s. economic growth. so, today we are re-releasing the study and his analysis of the potential economic impact of sequestration across the nation. let it be noted, no one can say that they w
it passes by earth tomorrow morning but you will be able to watch the historic site online. nasa will stream the approach starting at 9:00 a.m. at pacific time. the fly-by is expected to be the closest an asteroid has ever come to earth. it will be -- it will be about 17,000 miles from earth. the closest will be in indonesia. astronomers say it's about the size of a white house. >> that's a big boy. >> yeah, it is pretty big. >>> 7:54. >>> steve and i have been on fog patrol. we went on the air at 4:30 we've been watching it for hours now. steve will talk about the fog. but visibility is improving for drivers. if you are driving to the bay bridge toll plaza, that even looks a little bit better. the fog was pretty low at one point. it's backed under for about a 25 to 30-minute delay. that's your live drive time there. once you get on the bridge, another 12 to 15 minutes on the span. also, contra costa county is beginning to get slower. traffic time is way down from pleasant hill to walnut creek in danville and alamo. let's go to steve. >>> we still have areas of fog. other locations are alrea
as the snow encasing him down that mountain. >>> the ceo of apple and a nasa engineer sat with michelle obama. you can't sit close to your wife surrounding her with nerds. >> "cbs this morning." >> i literally couldn't move my legs so they'd have to pick up my legs and put them into my next outfit. >> whoa, now there is he aa job. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we start with breaking news the sweeping manhunt for fugitive ex-cop wanted in a deadly rampage appears to be over. overnight sheriff's deputies say charred remains were found inside a burned out cabin near big bear lake california east of los angeles. it's not yet confirmed the remains are those of christopher dorner. >> the cabin went up in flames after an intense shoot-out. only cbs news captured the gunfight while it was happening. carter evans was in the middle of it all and he is again in big bear. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, there is a new development. authorities are now reporting inside that burnt out cabin they found a california driver's license with the name "christopher dorner" on i
damaging. nasa and others assure us that it will not. but there is some risk that it could pop into one or more satellites. and that could change everything from gps to communications. so you have to be ready for surprises. >> is this why volume is so light, even though -- >> people are in their bunkers? >> everybody's hunkering down in front of the asteroid. no, i think the volume is light, because we're right at an uptrend line. and we're either consolidating for a break-through, which would be very important, or we're stalling and pulling back. if you go back into may of 2011, we've hit this uptrend line several times. and each time we've had a pullback that was not insignificant. >> that's funny, the journal points out, we hit 14 k on february 1st, and since then, we've gone up 141 times. you've made the point before, these psychological levels are like the hard door, and the battering ram has to hit them a few times, more than once. >> it is. people have to feel more relaxed about the fact that we've gotten here, we're moving through. you know, for old-time traders, we're not only
's operation of the national airspace system, nasa's space exploration program, and noaa's work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today is going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. the study says, see quest racial -- sequestration, if it goes forward, will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non-defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are re-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not forewarned about the
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)